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Photo by Joseph De Leo, Food Styling by Erika Joyce
  • Total Time

    45 minutes

You don’t need to be French to make this magnifique homemade crepe recipe. But having a specialized crepe pan? That does help. If you’re not ready to invest, pull out your shallowest nonstick skillet (carbon steel is a great choice) to make these thin pancakes. The real secret lies in a bit of self-confidence. While making crepe batter is a snap (here it’s done in a blender, but you could whisk the ingredients together in a large bowl if you’d like), perfecting the swirl of the wrist necessary to make that batter spread evenly may require some practice. Keep at it and you’ll soon learn how to make crepes perfectly every time.

This recipe calls for brandy and vanilla extract, but feel free to experiment with other liqueurs, such as two parts bourbon and one part Amaretto, or substitute cognac or fruit-flavored eau-de-vie. Keep the cooked crepes stacked on a plate in a low oven, loosely covered with foil while you finish working.

These sweet crepes will be the star of any brunch spread—just don’t forget your favorite fillings. Try apple butter or apricot jelly, or top with powdered sugar and lemon zest, maple syrup, whipped cream, fresh fruit, or lemon curd. For savory crepe filling ideas, consider a swirl of ricotta or a swipe of cream cheese—or go for Buckwheat Crepes With Spiced Chicken or Romanian fried crepes with mushrooms.

Editor’s note: This recipe was originally published in August 2004 as “Breakfast Crepes.”

Ingredients

Makes approximately 12-15 crepes

1½ cups whole milk
3 large eggs
3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
Scant 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
½ cup brandy
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup all-purpose flour
Additional butter for cooking
Additional sugar or jelly such as apple or apricot for serving
Special equipment:
Iron skillet or crepe pan, flexible metal or plastic spatula

Step 1

In a blender, combine milk and eggs. Mix on medium-high speed until foamy, about 10 seconds. Turn blender to low speed and remove feed top. With blender going, add sugar and salt. Replace feed top and blend on high speed for a few seconds, then turn blender back to low. In the same manner, add butter, brandy, and vanilla, replacing feed top and blending for several seconds after each addition. Turn blender off. Add flour all at once and blend until just combined.

Step 2

Place crepe pan over moderately high heat. With flexible spatula, spread a tiny amount of butter in pan (an alternative method is to brush the pan with melted butter using a pastry brush) and heat until butter just begins to smoke. Pour ¼ to ⅓ cup batter into the center of the pan. As you pour, quickly tilt the pan in all directions to spread a thin layer of batter across the bottom. Pour in just enough batter to cover the pan.

Step 3

Cook crepe over moderately high heat until bubbles just begin to form on the exposed surface, about one to two minutes. Lift up the edge to check the cooking process—if the crepe starts to burn before it is cooked through, turn down the heat. If it is not nicely browned after two minutes, turn up the heat.

Step 4

When underside of crepe is browned, flip and cook another minute or less, until other side is browned. Remove from pan and keep warm in the oven, loosely covered with foil.

Step 5

Grease pan with a very small amount of butter and repeat process. Continue until remaining batter is used, stacking cooked crepes on a plate in the oven. To serve, sprinkle each crepe with sugar or spread with jelly and fold or roll up.

Do Ahead: Crepe batter can be made 1 day ahead. Refrigerate, covered, and blend briefly to recombine before cooking.

Note:

Making the batter for these crepes is relatively easy, but cooking them one-by-one can be laborious. Once you have a gotten a feel for the technique (you will probably have to tinker with the heat and cooking time, since every pan behaves slightly differently), you can save time by using two pans at once. Stagger the process so you are pouring the batter into one pan while a crepe is cooking in the other. This way, you will be able to closely attend to both but will finish in half the time.

How would you rate Crepes With Brandy?

Leave a Review

Tell us what you think
  • So delicious! My family love these! I enjoy the story behind them. The scent of the bandy batter cooking is wonderful. I have made the original and variations, like today with cream and water for milk and scotch for brandy 1/4 cup. Still delicious 😋

    • MelissaBee

    • Pullman, WA

    • 12/17/2021

  • Why would you add brandy in it? 😕

    • Anonymous

    • 10/19/2020

  • I've been making these crepes for years. We love this recipe, and guests always rave about them. I've only made them with Courvoisier because that always seems to be all we have on hand at the time, and unless I'm making them for children, I wouldn't dare decrease the amount of alcohol. The taste of the Cognac definitely comes through, but it only complements any type of filling we've ever used. It is simply delicious. And I don't understand why other people are adding flour to thicken their batter. I simply use a 1/3 of a cup of batter in my small crepe pan instead of 1/4, and that alone makes for a thicker crepe. 1/4 is doable, but it is very thin. I've never had a problem flipping these crepes either. It is always a two handed operation, but that's the nature of the dish. And when one is done, I can actually just tip the pan and slide the crepe onto my warming plate. I will say that keeping a piece of loose foil over your plate of crepes in the warming oven really makes a difference.

    • marzen

    • Florida

    • 7/5/2020

  • Perfect. Thanks!

    • lizcraigmyers

    • Park City, UT

    • 4/9/2020

  • This is the best crepe recipe I’ve ever tried! As I turned the crepes over I sprinkled a tiny bit of powdered sugar and grated some lemon zest... then folded them and put them on a platter. Added berries later. Kids devoured them! The brandy really added flavor and complexity. Highly recommend.

    • jenjohnstadringler8150

    • Henderson, NV

    • 6/2/2019

  • I skipped the added sugar and used this delicious recipe as a vehicle for both sweet and savory crepes. They were wonderful!

    • harr0028

    • Minneapolis, MN

    • 3/5/2018

  • I bought a bottle of Pear eau-de-vie for a recipe and wanted to find more recipes to use up the bottle quickly so this recipe came up and I gave it a go with all the positive reviews.. and indeed, the crepes were very good texture and quick to make. Best thing is no proofing - coz my other go to crepe recipe asks for 2 hours proofing. One batch made 14 crepes and they're all gone at the end of breakfast. I will definitely be using more of this recipe when I need a quick crepe !

    • witty_mum

    • irvine, ca

    • 10/1/2017

  • This is the best recipe I have found! I have been searching and trying all recipes from Betty Crocker to allrecipes and have all been bland flavorless crepes! Finally, this recipe got it right! I omitted the brandy and replaced with 1/2 cup of milk. Amazing flavor!!!!

    • rainordby2653

    • St. Paul

    • 5/11/2017

  • This recipe is my favorite! after failing many times using other recipes, this is the one I shall always and forever make. However, I don't cook with alcohol, so I just added more milk to make up the difference. Also, I forgot to add the butter until the very end, but after whisking it (I also used a whisk instead of a blender, I like doing things by hand) it turned out great! So delicious! 10/10 would recommend and WILL make again :) So easy.

    • emmaballerina

    • Provo, UT

    • 3/13/2017

  • This is my "go to"recipe for crepes. I've made them with whatever liquor I have on hand (amaretto or khalua are the faves around here) and also without alcohol for more savory options by simply increasing the milk by a half cup. I make per instructions when I can with a conventional blender but can't add while running in my Ninja (too much splatter) and it still turns out nicely.

    • schaffy

    • 2/12/2017

  • Great recipe!!! Followed it as written but took the advice of one of the reviewers and flipped the crepes into a larger pan. It worked beautifully. Once in the second pan, I alternated filling them with either chopped ham and gruyère or fig jam or Nutella. I kept them warm in a 185 oven.... They didn't dry out and were delicious. Don't be intimidated.... This was easy easy and worth the time.

    • Anonymous

    • Suffern, NY

    • 11/12/2016

  • As others have said, this one is really tasty. i used a mix of brandy and cognac since i ran out of brandy and all was fine.

    • talllankydude

    • Somerville, MA

    • 10/29/2016

  • These crepes are absolutely perfect. I have made them dozens of times-- with and without the brandy, and with many different fillings-- and they are always a huge hit. I often substitute unsweetened almond milk, and the variation is great. The mix stores well in a jar in the fridge for a day or two. It takes a little practice making fillings that pair well with the brandy, but some ideal ones are lemon juice with sugar, peach compote, and whole milk yogurt with berries and a twist of orange over the top.

    • hflyer13

    • Atlanta, GA

    • 9/21/2015

  • Great go-to recipe for brunch or breakfast. The butter and brandy can be pared down somewhat and the whole milk can be substituted with almond milk quite successfully (keep the butter at the same amount as in recipe though). Results come out great, and I love this with fried bananas, mangos&orange or other fillings (pina colada of pinneaple, mango and coconut ?).

    • akoloj

    • 3/29/2015

  • And I forgot to mention, I omitted the Brandy!

    • abcooks4u

    • Boston, MA

    • 12/25/2014

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